Best Practices

DevSecOps: Integrating Security into DevOps – Part 8

March 7, 2023 Azure, Azure DevOps, Best Practices, Cloud Computing, Code Analysis, Development Process, DevOps, DevSecOps, Dynamic Analysis, Emerging Technologies, Microsoft, Resources, SecOps, Secure communications, Security, Software Engineering, Software/System Design, Static Analysis No comments

Continuing from our previous blog, let’s explore some more advanced topics related to DevSecOps implementation.

Continuous Compliance

Continuous compliance is a practice that involves integrating compliance requirements into the software development lifecycle. By doing so, organizations can ensure that their software complies with regulatory requirements and internal security policies. Continuous compliance includes the following activities:

  1. Compliance as Code: Define compliance requirements as code, using tools such as Chef InSpec or HashiCorp Sentinel.
  2. Compliance Testing: Automate compliance testing to ensure that the software complies with regulatory requirements and security policies.
  3. Compliance Reporting: Generate compliance reports to track compliance status and demonstrate compliance to auditors and stakeholders.
  4. Compliance Remediation: Automate the remediation of compliance issues to ensure that the software remains compliant throughout the development lifecycle.

Cloud Security

Cloud security is a critical aspect of DevSecOps. It involves securing the cloud environment, including the infrastructure, applications, and data, on which the software is deployed. Cloud security includes the following activities:

  1. Cloud Security Architecture: Design a cloud security architecture that follows best practices and security policies.
  2. Cloud Security Controls: Implement security controls to protect cloud resources, such as firewalls, access control, and encryption.
  3. Cloud Security Monitoring: Monitor cloud activity and log data to detect potential security issues and enable forensic analysis.
  4. Cloud Security Compliance: Ensure that the cloud environment complies with regulatory requirements and security policies.

Threat Modeling

Threat modeling is a practice that involves identifying potential threats to an organization’s systems and applications and designing security controls to mitigate those threats. Threat modeling includes the following activities:

  1. Threat Identification: Identify potential threats to the software, such as unauthorized access, data breaches, and denial of service attacks.
  2. Threat Prioritization: Prioritize threats based on their severity and potential impact on the organization.
  3. Security Control Design: Design security controls to mitigate identified threats, such as access control, encryption, and monitoring.
  4. Threat Modeling Review: Review the threat model periodically to ensure that it remains up-to-date and effective.

Conclusion

DevSecOps is a critical practice that requires continuous improvement and refinement. By implementing continuous compliance, cloud security, and threat modeling, organizations can improve their security posture significantly. These practices help integrate compliance requirements into the software development lifecycle, secure the cloud environment, and design effective security controls to mitigate potential threats. By following these best practices, organizations can build and deploy software that is secure, compliant, and efficient in a DevSecOps environment.

DevSecOps: Integrating Security into DevOps – Part 7

March 6, 2023 Azure, Azure DevOps, Code Analysis, Development Process, DevOps, DevSecOps, Dynamic Analysis, KnowledgeBase, Microsoft, Resources, SecOps, Security, Software Engineering, Software/System Design, Static Analysis No comments

Continuing from my previous blog, let’s explore some more advanced topics related to DevSecOps implementation.

Automated Vulnerability Management

Automated vulnerability management is a key practice in DevSecOps. It involves using automated tools to identify, prioritize, and remediate vulnerabilities in an organization’s systems and applications. Automated vulnerability management includes the following activities:

  1. Vulnerability Scanning: Use automated vulnerability scanning tools to scan systems and applications for known vulnerabilities.
  2. Vulnerability Prioritization: Prioritize vulnerabilities based on their severity and potential impact on the organization.
  3. Patch Management: Automate the patching process to ensure that vulnerabilities are remediated quickly and efficiently.
  4. Reporting: Generate reports to track the status of vulnerabilities and the progress of remediation efforts.

Shift-Left Testing

Shift-left testing is a practice that involves moving testing activities earlier in the software development lifecycle. By identifying and fixing defects earlier in the development process, shift-left testing helps organizations reduce the overall cost and time required to develop and deploy software. Shift-left testing includes the following activities:

  1. Unit Testing: Automate unit testing to ensure that individual code components are working correctly.
  2. Integration Testing: Automate integration testing to ensure that multiple code components are working correctly when integrated.
  3. Security Testing: Automate security testing to ensure that the software is secure and compliant with security policies and regulatory requirements.
  4. Performance Testing: Automate performance testing to ensure that the software is performing correctly under different load conditions.

Infrastructure Security

Infrastructure security is a critical aspect of DevSecOps. It involves securing the underlying infrastructure, such as servers, databases, and networks, on which the software is deployed. Infrastructure security includes the following activities:

  1. Secure Configuration: Ensure that the infrastructure is configured securely, following best practices and security policies.
  2. Access Control: Control access to infrastructure resources to ensure that only authorized users and processes can access them.
  3. Monitoring and Logging: Monitor infrastructure activity and log data to detect potential security issues and enable forensic analysis.
  4. Disaster Recovery: Develop and implement disaster recovery plans to ensure that critical infrastructure can be restored in case of a security incident or outage.

Conclusion

DevSecOps is a critical practice that requires continuous improvement and refinement. By implementing automated vulnerability management, shift-left testing, and infrastructure security, organizations can improve their security posture significantly. These practices help identify and remediate vulnerabilities early in the development process, secure the underlying infrastructure, and ensure compliance with security policies and regulatory requirements. By following these best practices, organizations can build and deploy software that is secure, compliant, and efficient in a DevSecOps environment.

DevSecOps: Integrating Security into DevOps – Part 6

March 5, 2023 Azure, Azure DevOps, Best Practices, Code Analysis, Development Process, DevOps, DevSecOps, Dynamic Analysis, Emerging Technologies, Microsoft, Resources, SecOps, Secure communications, Security, Software Engineering, Software/System Design, Static Analysis No comments

Continuing from my previous blog, let’s explore some more advanced topics related to DevSecOps implementation.

Threat Intelligence

Threat intelligence is the process of gathering information about potential threats and vulnerabilities to an organization’s systems and applications. It involves collecting, analyzing, and disseminating information about potential threats, vulnerabilities, and threat actors. Threat intelligence includes the following activities:

  1. Collection: Collect information about potential threats from various sources, such as social media, security vendors, and security researchers.
  2. Analysis: Analyze the collected information to identify potential threats and vulnerabilities.
  3. Dissemination: Disseminate the analyzed information to relevant stakeholders, such as security teams, system administrators, and executives.
  4. Response: Develop and implement response plans to mitigate identified threats and vulnerabilities.

Container Security

Containers have become a popular way to deploy and manage applications in a DevSecOps environment. However, they also introduce new security challenges. Container security includes the following activities:

  1. Image Scanning: Scan container images for vulnerabilities before deployment to ensure that they do not introduce potential security risks.
  2. Access Control: Control access to containers to ensure that only authorized users and processes can access them.
  3. Runtime Security: Monitor container runtime behavior to detect potential security issues, such as unauthorized access and malicious activity.
  4. Compliance: Ensure that container deployment and management comply with regulatory requirements and security policies.

Serverless Security

Serverless computing is a way to deploy and manage applications without the need for managing infrastructure. However, it also introduces new security challenges. Serverless security includes the following activities:

  1. Access Control: Control access to serverless functions to ensure that only authorized users and processes can access them.
  2. Data Protection: Protect sensitive data processed by serverless functions using encryption and access control mechanisms.
  3. Runtime Security: Monitor serverless function runtime behavior to detect potential security issues, such as unauthorized access and malicious activity.
  4. Compliance: Ensure that serverless deployment and management comply with regulatory requirements and security policies.

Conclusion

DevSecOps is a critical practice that requires continuous improvement and refinement. By implementing threat intelligence, container security, and serverless security, organizations can improve their security posture significantly. These practices help gather information about potential threats and vulnerabilities, secure container and serverless environments, and ensure compliance with regulatory requirements and security policies. By following these best practices, organizations can build and deploy software that is secure, compliant, and efficient in a DevSecOps environment.

DevSecOps: Integrating Security into DevOps – Part 3

March 2, 2023 Azure DevOps, Best Practices, Code Analysis, Code Quality, Development Process, DevOps, DevSecOps, Dynamic Analysis, SecOps, Secure communications, Security, Software Engineering, Software/System Design, Static Analysis No comments

Continuing from my previous blog, let’s explore some more advanced topics related to DevSecOps implementation.

Shift-Left Testing

One of the key concepts in DevSecOps is shift-left testing. This means shifting security testing as far left in the software development process as possible. This helps identify security issues early in the development process, which is much cheaper and easier to fix than if they are discovered later in the process. Shift-left testing includes the following types of testing:

  1. Static Application Security Testing (SAST): SAST analyzes the source code for security vulnerabilities. It helps identify issues such as buffer overflows, SQL injection, and cross-site scripting (XSS).
  2. Dynamic Application Security Testing (DAST): DAST tests the software in a running state to identify vulnerabilities in real-time. It helps identify issues such as injection attacks, cross-site scripting, and authentication flaws.
  3. Interactive Application Security Testing (IAST): IAST combines the best aspects of SAST and DAST by analyzing the code while the software is running. This helps identify security issues more accurately and efficiently.
  4. Software Composition Analysis (SCA): SCA analyzes the third-party software and libraries used in the application to identify any security vulnerabilities.

Continuous Security Monitoring

DevSecOps is not a one-time process but an ongoing process. Continuous security monitoring is essential to ensure that the software remains secure throughout its lifecycle. Continuous security monitoring includes the following activities:

  1. Real-time threat detection: It involves analyzing the system logs and network traffic to identify any suspicious behavior that could indicate a security breach.
  2. Vulnerability scanning: It involves running automated scans to identify security vulnerabilities in the software and infrastructure.
  3. Compliance monitoring: It involves monitoring the software and infrastructure to ensure that they comply with security policies and regulatory requirements.

Container Security

Containers are becoming increasingly popular for software development and deployment. However, they can also introduce new security challenges. Container security includes the following activities:

  1. Image scanning: It involves scanning the container images to identify any security vulnerabilities.
  2. Container runtime security: It involves monitoring the container environment to ensure that it remains secure.
  3. Orchestration security: It involves securing the container orchestration system, such as Kubernetes or Docker Swarm, to ensure that it remains secure.

Conclusion

DevSecOps is a critical practice that enables organizations to build and deploy secure software continuously. By implementing shift-left testing, continuous security monitoring, and container security, organizations can improve their security posture significantly. However, DevSecOps is not a one-time process but an ongoing process that requires continuous improvement and refinement. By following these best practices, organizations can build and deploy software that is secure, compliant, and efficient.

NDepend–VSTS/Azure DevOps Integration–Part 01

September 30, 2018 .NET, .NET Core, .NET Framework, Azure DevOps, Best Practices, Code Analysis, Code Quality, Dynamic Analysis, Emerging Technologies, Microsoft, Static Analysis, Tools No comments

In my previous article I wrote an introductory about NDepend and how it will be useful for Agile Team to ensure code quality.

In that article we found how we can use NDepend in a developer machine. Now with this article we will familiarize ourselves in using NDepend in your build automation pipeline in your VSTS/Azure DevOps Build Agent.

There are two types of integration possible for NDepend:

  1. Directly using NDepend Package Extension from VSTS Marketplace
  2. Manual Integration using NDepend Command Line Tool. (This would provide you more control over licensing by setting up the license in your own OnPrem VSTS Build Agent.

For the interest of this article I will cover the use of VSTS Package Extension and using NDepend Build Task in VSTS Build Pipeline.

Installation of NDepend Extension for VSTS/Azure DevOps :

1.) Got to Azure DevOps Market Place:  https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=ndepend.ndependextension

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2.) Click on Get to Install this extension in to your AzureDevOps account and follow the steps. For the demo purpose I am starting with 30 day free trial, otherwise you can go ahead and buy the full license.

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3.) Now when you get back to Azure DevOps project, you can see the NDepend side menu enabled, this is where you would see the report summary of your project.

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Integration NDepend into Azure DevOps Pipeline :

1.) Select “NDepend Task” and add in to Pipeline

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Note:

  • You can choose to stop the build when at least one quality gate fails.
  • You also need to specify the NDepend project file customized for your project, otherwise NDepend will use their default project file configuration.  Having your own NDepend project file will provide you more control over the policies for the scan.

Queue a new Build and wait for Build to complete. Now you can see the BuildArtifacts includes all NDepend report file.

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Now you go back to NDepend menu from Left side menu item in Summary Tab. This will provide you detailed view of Technical Debt in your project.

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In the next article I will cover the manual integration steps.

Introduction to NDepend : Static Code Analysis Tool

June 16, 2018 .NET, .NET Core, .NET Framework, ASP.NET, Best Practices, C#.NET, Code Analysis, Code Quality, Dynamic Analysis, Emerging Technologies, Help Articles, Microsoft, Static Analysis, Tech-Trends, Tools, Tools, Visual Studio 2017, VisualStudio, Windows No comments , , , , , ,

As a developer, you always have to take the pain of getting adapted to the best practices and coding guidelines to be followed as per the organizational or industrial standards.  Easy way to ensure your coding style follows certain standard is to manually analyze your code or use a static code analyzer like FxCop, StyleCop etc. Earlier days I have been a fan of FxCop as it was free and it provides me all necessary general guidelines in terms  of improving my solution.

In this modern world of programming everything needs to be automated, as it saves time and money in terms of automating repetitive tasks and improves efficiency. This is where static code analysers coming effective.

What is Static Code Analysis?

Static program analysis is the analysis of computer software that is performed without actually executing programs, on some version of the program source code, and in the other cases, some form of the object code or intermediate compiled code .

Sophistication of static program analysis increases is based on how deep they analyze in terms of behavior of individual statements and declarations, to analyzing the entire source code.

PS: Analysis performed on executing programs is known as dynamic analysis.

In this article I will give you an overview of one such premier static code analysis tool that can be used for your daily development routine plus use it for CI integration for DevOps efficiency.

NDepend:

NDepend is a static analysis tool for .NET, specifically for managed code:  NDepdend supports a large number of code metrics, allowing to visualize dependencies using directed graphs and dependency matrix. It also performs code base snapshots comparisons, and validation of architectural and quality rules.

The important capabilities of NDepend are:

  • Dependency Visualization through dependency matrix and graphs.
  • Analyse and generate software quality metrics – as per the documentation it supports 82 quality metrices.
  • Declarative rule support through LINQ queries, and it is called CQLinq and comes with a large number of predefined CQLinq rules.
  • Integration support for Cruise Control.Net, SonarCube, am City. Code rules can be configured to be checked automatically in Visual Studio or during continuous integration(CI).

License: NDepend is a commercial tool with licensing options as below:

  1. Developer seats – $477 approx. / per seat.
  2. Build Machine seats  – $955 approx. / per seat.

** You could get volume discount if you bulk procure your licenses.

Installation: 

Once you obtained license you will able to download NDepend_2018.1.1.9041.zip, is latest version available while I write this article. Extract the zip file into your local folder, you could see the different packages/executables within the package.

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1.) NDepend.Console    – Command line program to execute NDepend analysis.  You would be mostly using this component on CI Build server Help

2.) NDepend.PowerTools –  Helps write your own static analyzer based on NDepend.API, or tweak existing open-source Power Tools. Help

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3.) NDepend.VisualStudioExtension.Installer – To install NDepend extension as part of Visual studio

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4.) VisualNDepend – Independent visual environment for managing your NDepend tasks.

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Visual Tool gives you different options to choose from:

  • You can analyse a Visual Studio Solution or project.
  • Analyse .NET assemblies in a folder.

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For the demo purpose our analysis target would be one of the starter project from github –  ContosoUniversity by @alimon808.

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Demo: Summary Report

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Demo: Application Metrics

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Demo: Dependency Dashboard:

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Demo: Interactive Graph

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Demo: Code Matrix View

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Demo: Quality Gates Summary

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Demo: Rules Summary

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Conclusion:

NDepend is one of the best enterprise grade commercial static analyser seen so far.  There are Visual Studio Code Analysis, FxCop and Stylecop Analyzer tools available but they do not provide extensive level of analysis reports NDepend provides. Being a commercial tool it gives value for money for customers by what they need.  In terms of a day to day developer  or devops lifecycle, you can integrate NDepend in your build process, which could be simple as executing the NDepend Console and reviewing the output. With NDepend’s API it is easy to develop your own custom analysis tools based on CQLinq and NDepend.PowerTools(which is open source). You could find all the detailed help in NDepend documentation.

References: